Rhetorical Analysis Samples

Mad Men Moulin Rouge! - "Canadians"

Mad Men

The Falling Cat         

Mad Men's opening credits give a preview of what's going to happen to Don in the show. In the first part of the animated sequence Don sets his briefcase down and then everything in the office collapses — suggesting that his actions make everything fall down or fall apart. This connects to the second part, where he falls past advertising images containing alcohol and women — suggesting that he falls as a result of the very things he promotes in his office. Instead of crashing onto the pavement, however, Don lands safely — suggesting a cat-like ability to land on his feet no matter how hard he falls. The credits thus prepare us for Don's precipitous life of drinking and womanizing, and for his ability to land on his feet -- a cycle which repeats itself throughout the series.  

The long second part of the credits visually suggests that Don falls because of a combination of drinking and womanizing. Drinking and womanizing are explicitly linked: across from a fish-net stocking’d leg is a beer being poured; next to the gigantic mascara’d eyes of a brunette model is a giant tumbler with ice. Don also falls between two images of beautiful women straight into a giant tumbler of whiskey. Beneath the tumbler is a diamond ring sparkling on a finger — suggesting the marriage Don betrays by sleeping with other women. Don then falls past a tall man, a blond women, a boy, and a girl -- suggesting Don, Betty, and their son and daughter. Opposite this image of the happy nuclear family is the image of the beautiful woman with the tumbler and the thick mascara. Juxtaposing this woman with large, bedroom eyes with the happy family suggests that Don will lose his happy family because he keeps falling for other women.

Don's fall in the credits is seen again and again in seasons one and two (where we see his marriage with Betty fall apart), and it recurs later in the series. In "The Phantom" (S5 E13), Don literally walks away from his second wife Megan (who is ecstatic and tells him she loves him) and into an dark ornate bar, during which the James Bond song, "You Only Live Twice" starts to play. Don orders an Old Fashioned, which usually contains whiskey and other ingredients served in a tumbler — thus echoing the tumbler Don falls into during the credits. A beautiful young woman comes up to him, asking if he wants to join her and her friend. Don looks at the woman with bedroom eyes, which indicates to the viewer that he’s about to repeat the second part of the credits by falling for yet another woman who isn’t his wife.

In the third part of the credits, Don's sitting comfortably on a couch, which suggests that he’ll land on his feet -- as he does after his break-up with Megan, and as he does after he loses his job in season six. In the credits, Don's office collapses and he falls to the temptations of the commercial and sensual world he manipulates in his office, yet just as he doesn’t drown in the tumbler of whiskey, so he doesn’t fall onto the pavement and die. While we don’t see him land, we do find him sitting elegantly on a couch, the white cigarette in his hand offset by the white collar of his black suit (the clothing he’s worn throughout the credits and throughout the seven seasons of the series). Don’s cat-like ability to land safely can be seen in the last episode of season six: after losing both Megan and his job (his office collapsing metaphorically), he takes his children to look at the brothel where he grew up. As they stand looking at the decrepit house, we see that his daughter Sally still loves him, and that he has every chance of making her a part of his life.

(650 words)

The Falling Cat

The credits prepare us for Don's precipitous life of drinking and womanizing, and for his ability to land on his feet -- a cycle which repeats itself throughout the series.  

The long second part of the credits visually suggests that Don falls because of a combination of drinking and womanizing.

Don's fall in the credits is seen again and again in seasons one and two (where we see his marriage with Betty fall apart), and it recurs later in the series.

In the third part of the credits, Don's sitting comfortably on a couch, which suggests that he’ll land on his feet -- as he does after his break-up with Megan, and as he does after he loses his job in season six.

(123 words)

Moulin Rouge! ('Elephant Love Song Medley')

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All You Need is Love

In the “The Elephant Love Song Medley” the poor, idealistic writer Christian and the business-like courtesan Satine are drawn together into an almost magical world. The unity of this romantic world is created by the lyrics, which are increasingly integrated, and by the setting, which suggests intimacy and freedom.      

Luhrmann uses increasingly integrated lyrics to unite the pair, who literally and metaphorically start off on different notes yet end up on the same note. Initially, Satine speaks prose words at odds with the poetic words Christian sings: Christian uses a famous line from the Beatles, “All you need is love,” to which Satine responds -- without rhyme -- “A girl has got to eat.” Satine then drops the prose and starts to sing in poetry, yet she continues to contradict him: Christian sings a line from Kiss, “You were made for loving me,” to which Satine responds, “The only way of loving me, baby, is to pay a lovely fee.” Note that although she contradicts Christian, she's entering into the way he's communicating. We can see that Satine is coming around to Christian's point of view when she contradicts him using lyrics from the same song he sings. Finally, she looks out into the night sky of Paris and initiates a new song: “Some people want to fill the world / With silly love songs.” Christine responds, “Well, what's wrong with that? / I'd like to know.” She thus starts a song which she knows to have an argument which starts off against love songs, yet which ends up in favour of them. 

As they near the end of the medley, their interchange becomes more and more integrated. They sing in increasing unison the lyrics from David Bowie's “Heroes.” The lyrics are about living love “just for one day,” which is appropriate to the story, since Satine has a terminal illness and they won't have long to spend together. At the end of the medley they're singing the same words in harmony, Satine's higher voice floating above Christian's lower voice -- highlighting the female-male opposites as well as the attraction of these opposites. They then sing Whitney Houston's line, “I can't help loving you” in three parts: Satine sings “I,” they both sing “can't stop loving,” and Christian sings “you.” The final lyrics they sing are from Elton's John's “Your Song,” which Christian sang earlier in the film to Satine the first time he expressed his love for her. At that time, she was moved, yet she didn't enter into a medley duet -- also, she was under the illusion she was conversing with a rich Duke. This time, she knows who Christian is, and she initiates the same Elton John song: she sings “How wonderful life is,” and he then completes the line by singing, “when you're in the world.”

The setting of the scene also unites the pair by creating a romantic atmosphere, which encourages intimacy and freedom. The lights of Paris (often referred to as 'the city of love') sparkle in the distance and the night-time setting suggests the couple’s intimate seclusion -- away from society's notions about either high-class prostitutes or bohemian writers. Christian moves freely on top of the elephant that holds Satine’s bedroom, suggesting to Satine that they're free to do what they want. He demonstrates to her that no one can stop them when, after she yells for him to get down, he remains on the dome of the elephant’s head. Her life as a courtesan is beneath them, and for now they're close to the heavens and stars, breathing in the fresh air of the vast Paris sky surrounding them. The words, the music, the romance of Paris at night -- combined with other aspects of the setting -- such as the heart-shaped doorway that implodes into glittering fragments -- all suggest that Christian's romanticism will outweigh Satine's practicality in the end.

(650 words)

All You Need is Love

The unity of this romantic world is created by the lyrics, which are increasingly integrated, and by the setting, which suggests intimacy and freedom.      

Luhrmann uses increasingly integrated lyrics to unite the pair, who literally and metaphorically start off on different notes yet end up on the same note.

As they near the end of the medley, their interchange becomes more and more integrated.

The setting of the scene also unites the pair by creating a romantic atmosphere, which encourages intimacy and freedom.

(83 words)

"Canadians"

The following rhetorical analysis examines Atwood's “Canadians: What Do They Want?”, which can be found in your course-pack (the one you bought at the bookstore). Look closely at this sample of rhetorical analysis, particularly since later (when we get to the evaluation section of the course) you'll be looking at a sample essay that examines the same Atwood essay from an evaluative angle.

The Bristling North

       In her essay “Canadians: What Do They Want?” (1982) Margaret Atwood examines Canadian identity in relation to the United States. Leaving aside questions of Quebec nationalism, aboriginal land claims, and the influence of England, she focuses primarily on today’s over-riding influence on Canada -- the United States -- and on how Canadians sometimes bristle when Americans assume Canadians ought to be happy about the present position of influence Americans have in the world. Atwood gets her points across by using comparisons that align gender with militarism, that use geography to illustrate a power differential, and that make parallels between the history of Roman imperialism and US foreign policy.

       Atwood starts and ends her essay by aligning the male gender with militarism. Taking a feminist and pacifist position, she likens the violence of men to the violence of America. Men’s shoes remind her of jackboots or army boots, and she asserts that women have a difficult time appreciating the entirety of a man because even looking at his shoes reminds them of the violence men commit. Likewise, Canadians have a difficult time appreciating the positive aspects of America because they find it difficult to see past the violence Americans commit. She doesn't examine American violence, yet this is presumably obvious to Canadians who watch U.S. media, or who know about U.S. history.

       Atwood’s geographical comparison, between the U.S. and a hypothetically larger Mexico, is used to illustrate to her American audience the sensitivity that comes with a large power differential. She urges her audience to imagine a Mexico that's ten times as large as the US -- a hypothetical situation that may well resonate, given the large recent increases in Latino populations in the US, especially in states bordering Mexico. Explaining to Americans how their neighbours to the north feel, she points out that the uncomfortable feeling Canadians have (that they're like a satellite or branch plant) is a function of sheer numbers and economic forces, not of excessive national sensitivity. By giving Americans a comparison that they might appreciate, she aims to help them understand that Canadian resentment is a natural feeling. The resentment may cause Canadians to bristle, but it's understandable on an emotional level.

       Her discussion of the power differential leads to her third comparison -- between imperial Rome and imperial America. She asserts that just as France during the Roman Empire was a satellite, so Canada during the present American empire is a satellite. The difference, according to Atwood, is that the Romans didn't expect the French to like them, whereas Americans expect Canadians to like them. By giving this historic dimension to her essay, Atwood suggests that Canadian sentiment is a function of time, and is a function of a process that has happened for ages. It's really nothing unique or idiosyncratic. This historical comparison with Rome complements her previous geographical comparison (with Mexico) to give the reader a larger context -- in both space and time -- which aims to explain the feelings of Canadians.

 (500 words)

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